Someone Turn on the Light!

Coming to terms with the “theology of the cross,” and the fact that Jesus calls every disciple to “deny himself, and take up his cross daily and follow Me” (Luke 9:23, NASB), means coming to terms with authentic Christian living in everyday life.  Discipleship is not so much about studying the word as it is living the word as we learn it.  Discipleship is not so much about spending time in daily prayer as it is making our lives a perpetual and continual prayer unto God.  Discipleship has little to do with how many times we “gather with the saints at the river,” but with our willingness to love and serve a lost and dying world.  In fact, it grieves me, sometimes, that “church” has so commandeered our time, energy, and allegiance that people are too busy doing “churchy” stuff to connect with the world around them in authentic and meaningful ways.

Have you heard that old, kinda “worn out” adage that says: “I’d rather see a sermon than hear one, any day!”  Well, I guess, some old saying should be well remembered because Jesus says pretty much the same thing when He talks about our being “light” in this world of darkness.  He said:

“Now no one after lighting a lamp covers it over with a container, or puts it under a bed; but he puts it on a lampstand, so that those who come in may see the light. For nothing is hidden that will not become evident, nor anything secret that will not be known and come to light. So take care how you listen; for whoever has, to him more shall be given; and whoever does not have, even what he thinks he has shall be taken away from him.” (Luke 8:16-18, NASB)

In this passage, Jesus is reminding us that authentic faith ultimately gets down to what people “see” in us.  It’s all about “living” our faith in the eyes of the world; not just singing about it during the Sunday gathering.  And, if you look closely at Jesus statement above, you’ll notice that people have an uncanny knack for seeing through the surface of things into who and what we really are.  Yes, we all wear masks at times.  We all try to create a façade and manipulate people’s thinking concerning who we are and what we’re all about.  But that never really works, does it?  I mean, we all know that, eventually, the masks fall away and the façades disseminate in the light of daily living, don’t they?  We may fool a few people for a little while but, ultimately, the people who matter most in life, and the people who need us the most in life, are going to come to know us as we really are.

Jesus’ comments, above, remind me of the parable of the talents wherein we learn that those who hoard their gifts unto themselves, rather than investing them in life, love, relationships, and the mission our Lord has set before us, will ultimately loose them altogether.  How are we “living” our faith?

In what we’ve come to call, “The Sermon on the Mount,” Jesus initiated His earthly ministry with this very same concept, saying:

You are the salt of the earth; but if the salt has become tasteless, how can it be made salty again? It is no longer good for anything, except to be thrown out and trampled under foot by men. You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden; nor does anyone light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on the lampstand, and it gives light to all who are in the house. Let your light shine before men in such a way that they may see your good works, and glorify your Father who is in heaven. (Matthew 5:13-16)

When we put a little salt on our taters, we expect it to make a difference.  We would consider it “worthless” if it didn’t.  What good is salt that doesn’t enhance the taste of our food, preserve our pork, or help freeze our homemade ice-cream?  What good is a so-called “Christian” who hasn’t denied himself and taken up his cross; or who is not in hot pursuit of Jesus?  When it comes down to daily living, authentic faith can’t help be become evident in our lives.  People will see our faith, if what we have is a living faith, because it will be seen in our works — how we love, how we serve, how we seek to make a difference in this world and in the hearts and lives of others!  As James said, “But someone may well say, ‘You have faith and I have works; show me your faith without the works, and I will show you my faith by my works'” (James 2:18, NASB).

I hasten to add that a living faith should never be equated with dogmatic self-righteousness. People who interprete faith as “holiness” in the eyes of men, or as achieving some high level of “perfection” in our performance, have allowed our old Adversary to sidetrack, if not completely derail, them.  Faith is not acting like that self-righteous Pharisee who, when he came to pray, said, “God, I thank You that I am not like other people: swindlers, unjust, adulterers, or even like this tax collector. I fast twice a week; I pay tithes of all that I get” (Luke 18:11-12, NASB).  Rather, faith is becoming like that tax collector, standing some distance away, who was even unwilling to lift up his eyes to heaven, but was beating his breast, saying, “God, be merciful to me, the sinner!” (verse 13).  Faith is acknowledging that we’re all in the same boat, that “there is none righteous, not even one” (Romans 3:10, NASB) because “all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God” (verse 23).  Authentic faith is agreeing with heaven’s judgment, that, “If we say that we have no sin, we are deceiving ourselves and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say that we have not sinned, we make Him a liar and His word is not in us” (I John 1:8-10, NASB).

And, perhaps, this is the greatest testimony of the children of light; and the very thing that people need most to see in us.  They don’t need to hear our doctrine, so much, as they need to see our humility.  They don’t need us to slam dunk them with our righteousness — as though we were somehow better than them — so much as they need us to lay aside our masks, quit with our façades, and confess our weaknesses, our faults, our failures, and our need for Jesus.  While we seek to love them, while we seek to serve them, while we seek to go out of our way to make this world a better place by leading people to faith in Christ, people need to see these actions coming from broken and contrite hearts painfully aware of our own shortcomings, but all the more in love with Jesus for His sacrifice of grace and mercy.  This is the “theology of the cross.”  This is authentic Christian living.  This is real faith.  This is being the “salt of the earth” and the “light of the world!”  This is letting our light shine before men “in such a way” that they see our good works and give glory to our Father who is in heaven.

That they may see HIM in us,

~ Philip ~

Luke 17:10

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